Category Archives: Guest Preachers

Rev. Kathleen Dorr to preach June 28

Please come welcome Kathleen Dorr on Sunday, 28th.  The Rev. Kathleen Dorr, M.Div. has served the church and God’s people as an Episcopal priest for 20 years, most recently,  in the Diocese of Connecticut. She was ordained in the Diocese of Long Island and has served across the nation. Kathleen enjoys her rest and relaxation on Island spending as much time as possible in Oak Bluffs enjoying friends, the water and the Island. Rev. Dorr has served at the Cathedral of St. Matthew, Dallas , TX., in Bay Ridge, Brooklyn, as Interim Rector at Christ Church, Associate priest for Christ Church, New  Haven, CT., Chaplain of the Episcopal Church at Yale, Interim Missioner at Eagle Butte Reservation working with the Sioux Nation on the reservation, following these ministries Kathleen trained to be a hospital chaplain at the University hospital in Greenville, N.C. and became a Hospice chaplain working in this area over the past few years. Kathleen is the mother of two sons Robert, a Major in the U.S. Army and soon the U.S. Attache to Lebanon,  and Aaron who lives and works in the San Francisco area. Both sons are married and have blessed Kathleen with three young grandchildren. She is widowed and was married to the Rev. Lt. Col. Guy Dorr who, after an Army career, was also ordained in the church serving on Long Island and later in life with the Navajo Nation.
Her hobbies include scuba diving around the world, kayaking, hiking and traveling as often as possible.

April 12 Rev. Arlene Bodge: new contact info

20150412_102238Rev. Arlene preached on the 12th admonishing the congregation to rest on the Spirit in their upcoming time of transition.  She gave all sorts of parting advice and it was well received.

Her off-island contact information is:

Arlene Bodge, 303 Brooksby Drive, Unit 218, Peabody, MA 01960.  Her phone after May 1 will be 978-587-2699.

Lenten Letter from Bishop

April 1, 2014

My Dear Brothers and Sisters in Christ:

Greetings in the precious name of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ.

As we continue to journey in the Lenten season, particularly as we enter the Holy Week, I am sure that all of us reflect on many aspects of Jesus’s ministry and mission! Of course, each one of them is very important and vital.

One of the images I am reflecting on is Jesus washing the feet of His disciples. Perhaps one of the reasons for this is that in my recent pilgrimage to the Holy Land, someone presented me with a beautiful olive wood carving of Jesus washing the feet of a disciple. As I ponder on this image, one of the things that crosses my mind is Peter’s statement to Jesus, “You will never wash my feet” (John 13:6).

We may never know what prompted Peter to react in this way, or what was going on in his mind as Jesus approached to wash his feet. Perhaps this was a shock to Peter because in that culture washing one’s feet was not a task of a leader but of a subordinate.

Perhaps Peter was not able to understand and accept the symbolism of someone washing his feet.

Perhaps Peter was uncomfortable with someone touching his feet.

Perhaps Peter was not ready to be humbled by someone washing his feet.

But as one reflects upon this holy act on the part of Jesus, as one reflects upon the dialogue between Jesus and Peter around this issue, it becomes very clear that Christ is offering a model to all of his followers of His ministry and mission. Jesus makes it abundantly clear by saying, “Do you know what I have done to you? You call me Teacher and Lord-and you are right, for that is what I am. So, if I, your Lord and Teacher, have washed your feet, you also ought to wash one another’s feet. For I have set you an example, that you also should do as I have done to you.” (John 13:13-15).

May I prayerfully suggest you ponder this thought as we continue our journey as disciples of Jesus Christ? Where is God calling us to wash someone’s feet at this hour in our homes, neighborhoods, nation and world?

Today, the opportunity may not be there to necessarily physically touch someone’s feet and wash them … but what about spiritually, emotionally, and financially?

More importantly, how do we react or respond to this dialogue between Jesus and Peter, as we journey as disciples of Jesus in the twenty-first century? Perhaps one of the reasons Peter was reluctant to accept Christ’s offer was he believed doing so might be seen as a weakness or lack of leadership. A few years ago, a wise mentor reminded me that accepting someone’s help in our journey is not a weakness, but a strength indeed! Many a time we fail in our ministry because we are too confident of ourselves and we refuse to take someone else’s help.

As we journey as disciples of Jesus Christ, the context of our ministry is much different from years ago! As disciples of Jesus Christ, we are constantly pushed into the margins of our society, where the ministry of a towel and basin is a blessing! It is not a ministry where we have all the answers as individuals, but a ministry where we constantly need to hear one another, learn from one another, and understand one another. In that context our mentors and teachers might be fellow pilgrims who are younger or older than us, pilgrims who may have a different accent or different lifestyle, BUT they too are the children of God who have the same quest as ours.

May God grant you and me the wisdom, courage, peace, and direction filled with the love of Christ and the guidance of the Holy Spirit, so that we may resemble our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ, our guru, who taught us the importance of the ministry of the towel and basin.

May the power and courage of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ be our strength in the forthcoming Holy Week and always!

In Christ’s love,

Bishop Sudarshana Devadhar

Lyrics to Helen Stratford song sung 10/7/13

In Yonder Meadows

In these fields I’ve wandered, I’ve pondered,  I have grown

And my heart grows fonder, with each pasture I have known

And in yonder woods, I have followed the mossy banks

Of a trickling brook where I’ve knelt down to give thanks

 

These fields taught me compassion They taught me to forgive

And with mercy unrationed They taught me how to live

As a soul that’s fallen I’ve pounded my fists and wept

God must have heard me calling – For something in my spirit leapt

 

There’s a fog rolls in Each evening from the coast

It creeps across the landscapes like a phantom or ghost

It rolls across the meadow, the sorrells and the dales

Continues to drift even as dawn lifts Like a burka or veil

 

Through the mist I’m running  Heart pounding against my chest

To the spirit that is coming In whose presence I feel blessed

Yes Each moment hastens toward me  Impatient to impart

All that my soul craves  All that saves the wounded heart

 

With their verdant splendor

These fields taught me to believe

And persuaded me to surrender

In order that I might receive

No matter how far I wander

Or the qualities I lack

Or the years I have squandered

These fields, they always take me back

 

Helen Stratford

Michael Gilman, singer song writer

Mike Gilman from Aquinnah Baptist Church was our guest of honor as we celebrated Labor Day weekend at Chilmark  Community Church.

Mike sang his original songs “Why Did Jesus walk on Water?”  and “I’m having supper at the Lord’s Feast tonight”.  His father, George Gilman, is a summer member of our congregation.

We’re hoping Mike will return this winter for those of you who missed him.

Summer is winding down. We thanked Ann Deitrich for her labor running the Flea Market which ended yesterday.  We had 10 kids in Sunday School with summer friends lingering and back to school kids returning.

We said goodbye to all the kids from Shirley, MA.

And goodbye to Noah, visiting his grand parents, Connie and Preston:

 

We had a lot to celebrate this morning with Ted Mayhew back with us. We’re keeping him in our prayers.  Just 2 or 3 Lobster Roll Tuesdays to go.

 

90th Birthday Celebrated

Bob Conway started his week long birthday celebrations with a surprise visit from his sister, daughter and grand daughter who accompanied him to church.

When Phil Dietterich’s music blew over at the near conclusion of a Bach fugue, Bob jumped in to help.

 

Cake and candles after church.

 

Letter from Bishop Suda Devadhar

My Dear Brothers and Sisters in Christ:
Greetings in the precious name of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ.
Originally I had posted the following message on my facebook page. However, a few people suggested that I share this message with all of you as well.
This past weekend was an interesting and exciting one.  It culminated the first hundred days of my episcopacy in the New England area.  These were meaningful, hopeful, and joyful days centered around the prayer that God will help all of us – clergy, laity, Prema, and me – to continue our journey in the same spirit and joy.
The weekend events started on Saturday with clergy and laity from the Connecticut Western Massachusetts District of the New England Annual Conference sharing many touching, joyful, and reflective moments.  One among them was a powerful devotion led by a clergy member who shared the following story:
“Daoud Hari, a native of the Darfur region writes about the Sahara but he might also be talking about leading a church when he says:
‘The Sahara is an impossible place. All the trails are erased with each wind…You are modern and think your compass and your GPS will keep you from trouble.  But the batteries will give out in your GPS, or the sand will ruin it.  Your compass may break or become lost as you try to put away your bedding one morning in a hard sandstorm.  So you will want to know the ways that have worked for thousands of years.  If you are good, like my father and brothers, you will put a line of sticks in the sand at night, using the stars to mark your next morning’s direction of travel.’” – from The Translator by Daoud Hari
As we continued to reflect on this powerful story, Prema and I spent a joyful evening with a colleague and her spouse at their house.  Afterward, they were kind enough to lead us to the main road, so we would not lose our way.  Can you see?  They were our stars in the journey!
Early Sunday morning, Prema and I were watching parts of a live stream of the 150th Anniversary of the Church of South India (CSI) Shanthi Cathedral in Mangalore, India where I went to church occasionally, preached on a few occasions, and where I preached my trial sermon for my ordination process in 1977.  One of the many highlights of the celebrations which we watched through the live stream was a welcome dance by one of my great nieces, a fifteen-year old, in the classical Indian tradition of Bharata Natya. I have seen her performances many times, and this was one of her best!  Her dance was in a Christian setting and in Indian tradition, but the way in which she communicated allowed us to feel her soul, mind, and body – all synchronized to welcome the gathering. (If you have time, kindly watch the video.)
From that powerful experience, Prema and I worshipped with the saints of the Open Table of Christ in Providence, RI.  The Church of the Open Table is made up of people from all walks of life, from different cultures and orientations, where people from different regions of the world are invited to stand with the pastor and children as the advent candle is lit.  We heard transformational stories from people of the Christian faith tradition, other faith traditions, and people from no faith traditions at all.  A radically welcoming congregation indeed!
On my journey back, as I reflected upon all the things I heard and saw over the weekend, I wondered what it means to be “John the Baptists” in our own settings…where our cries may sound like a cry in the wilderness – cries like that of Mahatma Gandhi, Nelson Mandela, Mother Teresa, and others, no matter from which faith background we come.  However, in this advent season, may we, the children of God, join together with one another and “strive first for the kingdom of God and his righteousness.” (Matthew 6:33)
In order to achieve this, we need to listen to the wisdom of the brother in the Darfur region and other places in the world where the political, selfish greed generated by human beings continuously tries to block us and confuse us as we call for a transformation of the world as people of God.
What may we borrow from the traditions of other faiths and adopt into our journey of faith as Christians being faithful to the Gospel of Jesus Christ? What may we use from those rich heritages and traditions for the glory of God?  May we be as powerful a witness as a fifteen-year old girl who articulated it through her gift of dance?
No matter where we live, we can still come together as people of God where our tables are truly open to those who do not talk or act like us, to those who are radically different from us.  May we live the words of one of the hymns of the season when we sing, “the hopes and fears of all the years are met in thee tonight.”
Yes, it is possible, if we stretch our tents…and truly demonstrate, not just through slogans but with our actions and deeds, that we are indeed a Church with “open hearts, open minds, and open doors.”
May our prayers be in the words of Walter Brueggemann, “Come be present even here and there, and there and there.  Move us from our sandy certitudes to your grace-filled risk.  Move us to become more rock-like in compassion and abidingness and justice.  Move us to be more like you in our neighborliness and in our self-regard.  Yes, yes, yes – move us that we may finally, stand on the solid rock, no more sinking sand.” (Ed. Edwin Searcy: “Awed to Heaven, Rooted in Earth: Prayers of Walter Brueggemann,” Fortress Press, Minneapolis: 2003, p.17).
May God continue to bless you in this holy Advent season.
In Christ’s love,
Bishop Suda Devadhar